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Reblogged from elyel

nobszone:

deviantwatch:

elyel:

Lets clear this out! 

Yes, we are the couple from the cat pic, but that story is fake! we didnt wrote it!
Fortunately the real story is much more happy. Thats why we decided to upload a photo from our families together, our parents and our sisters! We have supportive families that love us and acept us. Is important to us that you share the real story behind this photo because is much more powerful and positive the true story, and we like to spred the positive message that everything always turn out just fine! you dont have to hide this from your family, they just need time to understand. The soon you tell them the soon you stop suffering and the aceptation process begin. 
Love to all of our followers and please share the real story and the positive message that we want to spred!
ElYEl

LMFAO PEOPLE HAVE NO SHAME

Whoever used this photo of a perfectly happy couple with a family that accepted them for who they are to promote an anti-homophobic agenda with a story that was completely fabricated has no shame.

(via patternsandinconsistencies)

Reblogged from 8-bit-goat

melodiesofmayhem:

crab-cakes:

kexx:

officer1bdi:

hannasnonsense:

Telling someone they’re not good enough is not okay

Telling someone they’re not good enough is not okay


I don’t care if you’re joking. I don’t care if you think ‘It will push them to work harder.’ Because it isn’t a joke, and it will not always make someone want to work harder to prove you wrong.

Sometimes they accept it as a fact, then they live with a mindset of “Why try when I’m just going to fail?”

It’s not okay.

GPOY

I remember acing my AP European History test and being ecstatic about it until I told my father and he shrugged it off like it was nothing. Then I felt terrible for feeling so proud of myself.

This sort of shit fucks people up man. Perfectionism is not something that can be obtained and it is a horrible, negative schema to get stuck in. No matter how well I did it was never good enough for my mom. “Go get involved! (when I was younger)” “Well now that you’re involved now I have to drive you places…” “Man Tae Kwon Do is getting pretty expensive” “Why would you quit? You quit everything! You’re a quitter.” “Omg why’d you get a B?” “Oh you got all As…eh.” Currently going through therapy to get over this mentality. 

"Everyone else can do this, why can’t you?" "You’re just being lazy, you need to work harder." "No, don’t give me excuses. You failed because you didn’t care enough." "You let yourself fail. You should have seen your partner’s behavior and taken the work load all onto yourself. You let that happen and you let yourself fail." "College is so important and you have to go" ( "I mean, sometimes some people aren’t cut out to go to college." ) "I know you’re capable of more than a C, so why aren’t you doing better." "You’re not trying hard enough to get a job. People probably haven’t called you back because your hair is a strange color" (fyi, it was a sandy blonde). "Why can’t you just do things my way for once."

There’s more where that came from, but I think you get the point. The hilarious part is that my mom always asks “You should come talk to me if you have any problems, okay honey?” Yeah, okay. That’s exactly what I’m going to do after 20 some odd years of that.

THIS. tHIS. THis. This. THIS. this. this x infinity cause this shit is stupid and needs to be stopped and wow.

(Source: 8-bit-goat, via yipsinternally)

Reblogged from everlarkdandelions

manuxinhace:

Fox News talks about working mothers’ negative impact on their children. AKA “When Fox News gets so misogynistic that their own anchor is 1026% done with them.” [x]

(Source: everlarkdandelions, via yipsinternally)

Reblogged from thepeoplesrecord
thebicker:

aka14kgold:

arbitrary-mask:

thepeoplesrecord:
The 1% wants to ban sleeping in cars - it hurts their ‘quality of life’April 16, 2014
Across the United States, many local governments are responding to skyrocketing levels of inequality and the now decades-long crisis of homelessness among the very poor … by passing laws making it a crime to sleep in a parked car.
This happened most recently in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley, where new billionaires are seemingly minted every month – and where 92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind. Dozens of cities have passed similar anti-homeless laws. The largest of them is Los Angeles, the longtime unofficial “homeless capital of America”, where lawyers are currently defending a similar vehicle-sleeping law before a skeptical federal appellate court. Laws against sleeping on sidewalks or in cars are called “quality of life” laws. But they certainly don’t protect the quality of life of the poor.
To be sure, people living in cars cannot be the best neighbors. Some people are able to acquire old and ugly – but still functioning – recreational vehicles with bathrooms; others do the best they can. These same cities have resisted efforts to provide more public toilet facilities, often on the grounds that this will make their city a “magnet” for homeless people from other cities. As a result, anti-homeless ordinances often spread to adjacent cities, leaving entire regions without public facilities of any kind.
Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere, despite the fact that the great majority of homeless people are trying to survive in the same communities in which they were last housed – and where they still maintain connections. Americans sleeping in their own cars literally have nowhere to go.
Indeed, nearly all homelessness in the US begins with a loss of income and an eviction for nonpayment of rent – a rent set entirely by market forces. The waiting lists are years long for the tiny fraction of housing with government subsidies. And rents have risen dramatically in the past two years, in part because long-time tenants must now compete with the millions of former homeowners who lost their homes in the Great Recession.
The paths from eviction to homelessness follow familiar patterns. For the completely destitute without family or friends able to help, that path leads more or less directly to the streets. For those slightly better off, unemployment and the exhaustion of meager savings – along with the good graces of family and friends – eventually leaves people with only two alternatives: a shelter cot or their old automobile.
However, in places like Los Angeles, the shelters are pretty much always full. Between 2011 and 2013, the number of unsheltered homeless people increased by 67%. In Palo Alto last year, there were 12 shelter beds for 157 homeless individuals. Homeless people in these cities do have choices: they can choose to sleep in a doorway, on a sidewalk, in a park, under a bridge or overpass, or – if they are relatively lucky – in a car. But these cities have ordinances that make all of those choices a criminal offense. The car is the best of bad options, now common enough that local bureaucrats have devised a new, if oxymoronic, term – the “vehicularly housed”.
People sleeping in cars try to find legal, nighttime parking places, where they will be less apparent and arouse the least hostility. But cities like Palo Alto and Los Angeles often forbid parking between 2am and 5am in commercial areas, where police write expensive tickets and arrest and impound the vehicles of repeat offenders. That leaves residential areas, where overnight street parking cannot, as a practical matter, be prohibited.
One finds the “vehicularly housed” in virtually every neighborhood, including my own. But the animus that drives anti-homeless laws seems to be greatest in the wealthiest cities, like Palo Alto, which has probably spawned more per-capita fortunes than any city on Earth, and in the more recently gentrified areas like Los Angeles’ Venice. These places are ruled by majorities of “liberals” who decry, with increasing fervor, the rapid rise in economic inequality. Nationally, 90% of Democrats (and 45% of Republicans) believe the government should act to reduce the rich-poor gap.
It is easy to be opposed to inequality in the abstract. So why are Los Angeles and Palo Alto spending virtually none of their budgets on efforts to provide housing for the very poor and homeless? When the most obvious evidence of inequality parks on their street, it appears, even liberals would rather just call the police. The word from the car: if you’re not going to do anything to help, please don’t make things worse.
Source

“Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere…”
HOW? WITH WHAT FUNDS? FOR WHOSE BENEFIT? TO WHERE?
Our society’s approach to its most vulnerable members: I don’t want to see them suffer—so get them out of my sight!

I live in Los Angeles. Unlike most places, our housing economy bounced back, and fast - home prices are up 20 percent just in the past year. Renting is only marginally less expensive than buying a house. I know people whose rent went up by more than $200/month in a single year.
Homeless shelters are like telephone poles: We need them, but no one wants to live near one. It’s cruel and inhumane.

thebicker:

aka14kgold:

arbitrary-mask:

thepeoplesrecord:

The 1% wants to ban sleeping in cars - it hurts their ‘quality of life’
April 16, 2014

Across the United States, many local governments are responding to skyrocketing levels of inequality and the now decades-long crisis of homelessness among the very poor … by passing laws making it a crime to sleep in a parked car.

This happened most recently in Palo Alto, in California’s Silicon Valley, where new billionaires are seemingly minted every month – and where 92% of homeless people lack shelter of any kind. Dozens of cities have passed similar anti-homeless laws. The largest of them is Los Angeles, the longtime unofficial “homeless capital of America”, where lawyers are currently defending a similar vehicle-sleeping law before a skeptical federal appellate court. Laws against sleeping on sidewalks or in cars are called “quality of life” laws. But they certainly don’t protect the quality of life of the poor.

To be sure, people living in cars cannot be the best neighbors. Some people are able to acquire old and ugly – but still functioning – recreational vehicles with bathrooms; others do the best they can. These same cities have resisted efforts to provide more public toilet facilities, often on the grounds that this will make their city a “magnet” for homeless people from other cities. As a result, anti-homeless ordinances often spread to adjacent cities, leaving entire regions without public facilities of any kind.

Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere, despite the fact that the great majority of homeless people are trying to survive in the same communities in which they were last housed – and where they still maintain connections. Americans sleeping in their own cars literally have nowhere to go.

Indeed, nearly all homelessness in the US begins with a loss of income and an eviction for nonpayment of rent – a rent set entirely by market forces. The waiting lists are years long for the tiny fraction of housing with government subsidies. And rents have risen dramatically in the past two years, in part because long-time tenants must now compete with the millions of former homeowners who lost their homes in the Great Recession.

The paths from eviction to homelessness follow familiar patterns. For the completely destitute without family or friends able to help, that path leads more or less directly to the streets. For those slightly better off, unemployment and the exhaustion of meager savings – along with the good graces of family and friends – eventually leaves people with only two alternatives: a shelter cot or their old automobile.

However, in places like Los Angeles, the shelters are pretty much always full. Between 2011 and 2013, the number of unsheltered homeless people increased by 67%. In Palo Alto last year, there were 12 shelter beds for 157 homeless individuals. Homeless people in these cities do have choices: they can choose to sleep in a doorway, on a sidewalk, in a park, under a bridge or overpass, or – if they are relatively lucky – in a car. But these cities have ordinances that make all of those choices a criminal offense. The car is the best of bad options, now common enough that local bureaucrats have devised a new, if oxymoronic, term – the “vehicularly housed”.

People sleeping in cars try to find legal, nighttime parking places, where they will be less apparent and arouse the least hostility. But cities like Palo Alto and Los Angeles often forbid parking between 2am and 5am in commercial areas, where police write expensive tickets and arrest and impound the vehicles of repeat offenders. That leaves residential areas, where overnight street parking cannot, as a practical matter, be prohibited.

One finds the “vehicularly housed” in virtually every neighborhood, including my own. But the animus that drives anti-homeless laws seems to be greatest in the wealthiest cities, like Palo Alto, which has probably spawned more per-capita fortunes than any city on Earth, and in the more recently gentrified areas like Los Angeles’ Venice. These places are ruled by majorities of “liberals” who decry, with increasing fervor, the rapid rise in economic inequality. Nationally, 90% of Democrats (and 45% of Republicans) believe the government should act to reduce the rich-poor gap.

It is easy to be opposed to inequality in the abstract. So why are Los Angeles and Palo Alto spending virtually none of their budgets on efforts to provide housing for the very poor and homeless? When the most obvious evidence of inequality parks on their street, it appears, even liberals would rather just call the police. The word from the car: if you’re not going to do anything to help, please don’t make things worse.

Source

Their hope, of course, is that homeless people will go elsewhere…”

HOW? WITH WHAT FUNDS? FOR WHOSE BENEFIT? TO WHERE?

Our society’s approach to its most vulnerable members: I don’t want to see them suffer—so get them out of my sight!

I live in Los Angeles. Unlike most places, our housing economy bounced back, and fast - home prices are up 20 percent just in the past year. Renting is only marginally less expensive than buying a house. I know people whose rent went up by more than $200/month in a single year.

Homeless shelters are like telephone poles: We need them, but no one wants to live near one. It’s cruel and inhumane.

(via yipsinternally)

Reblogged from feministlibrarian
I wouldn’t necessarily mind people not knowing I’m gay, but I don’t like being thought of as straight — in the same way that I don’t mind people not knowing I’m a writer, but it would be awkward if they assumed I was an extreme skateboarder, because that’s so far removed from the reality of my life. But there is no blank slate where orientation is concerned; we are straight until proven otherwise. And if you’ve never seen how dramatically a conversation can be derailed by a casual admission of homosexuality, let me tell you, it gets awkward.

My Life as an Invisible Queer - Cosmopolitan (via feministlibrarian)

This speaks to me so much, and is probably the most important part, but let me tell you, I like this bit more:

What would be great, I think, is if I could hire some kind of old-timey town crier to precede me into any room I enter, shouting “Lesbian coming! Lesbian coming this way!” and possibly ringing some kind of bell. Then everyone would already know before our interaction commenced, and they could be pleasant or horrible as the spirit moved them, but at least we’d be communicating from a place of honesty and I wouldn’t have to worry about whether I’ll inadvertently reveal myself.

(via aceadmiral)

(via becauseiamawoman)

Reblogged from exoticwild

exoticwild:

What I’m really terrified of is leading an average, ordinary life with a regular job and an invariable routine, planned holidays, an average household, fixed responsibilities and not doing anything different to be remembered by.

(via softgrungenorway)

Reblogged from riddlemetom
Reblogged from sizvideos

anastasiajeanettemarie:

sizvideos:

If Girls Hit On Guys Like Guys Hit On Girls - Video

LOOK AT THIS. LOOK AT THIS, MEN WHO DO THIS, AND FEEL FOOLISH

(via we-found-the-rebel-bassist)

Reblogged from blindednobility
rajingstorms:

blindednobility:

Heterosexual/Homosexual
Lately, straight people have been bashed by the LGBT community as well. People are getting cocky(not saying that heterosexual people aren’t cocky too…)
I believe it’s the uprising in support for same sex couples.
(I myself am not straight, so please don’t call me ‘homophobic’)
which brings me to another point
Just because someone doesn’t support homosexuality, or doesn’t like it, doesn’t mean they’re homophobic. It’s when they insult/degrade/bash a person due to the fact that they’re gay that we have a problem.
Male/Female
Here, I’m talking about the extreme feminists/extreme misogynists
Women, please, for fuck’s sake, do not wish for a man to be castrated/raped/neutered. 
Men, please…Women have grown out of the era where we ‘stay in the kitchen/stay home/take care of the children’. There are a lot of women who prefer to get jobs, help support their family, and contribute to society by getting jobs. It should not be the man’s job to bring home the pay check. With the wife bringing one home too, hey more money! Also, both: The opposite sex is not a sex object. No gender is a sex object. The human body is not a sex object. Stop treating it as such.
Tumblr/tumblr gay shippers
For fuck’s sake, do you listen to yourselves when you say ‘make heterosexuality illegal’
…Just think over that.
This one last topic:
Anyone can rape. Anyone. And it’s still fucking serious.
Men can rape women.Women can rape men.Women can rape women.Men can rape men.
Not saying that they should, but It’s just as important/serious. I’ve seen arguments saying it’s not as mentally/physically damaging if a man is raped, or he’s ‘gay’ because he didn’t enjoy it, or that he’s ‘weak’ because a woman ‘overpowered’ him.
Just stop.
Rape is serious. Okay? Okay.
But please, can we all just practice some empathy before we start arguments/bashing? We all have different opinions. Just ‘take a step in the other person’s shoes’. 
We shouldn’t act like a bag of dicks. Seriously.
(Also, I would like to point out that I’m not straight and support gay marriage, but hetero people exist and is the ‘norm’, as they say, and I’m alright with that. Anyone hating on anybody won’t make them any better)

I like how this is one of the ONLY things I have seen on Tumblr today that makes sense and isn’t just “Hurrr, straight white male privilege,” yet it doesn’t even get a quarter of reposts or likes than any of that dribble. Everyone just needs to shut the fuck up, grow up, and get along.

rajingstorms:

blindednobility:

Heterosexual/Homosexual

Lately, straight people have been bashed by the LGBT community as well. People are getting cocky(not saying that heterosexual people aren’t cocky too…)

I believe it’s the uprising in support for same sex couples.

(I myself am not straight, so please don’t call me ‘homophobic’)

which brings me to another point

Just because someone doesn’t support homosexuality, or doesn’t like it, doesn’t mean they’re homophobic. It’s when they insult/degrade/bash a person due to the fact that they’re gay that we have a problem.

Male/Female

Here, I’m talking about the extreme feminists/extreme misogynists

Women, please, for fuck’s sake, do not wish for a man to be castrated/raped/neutered

Men, please…Women have grown out of the era where we ‘stay in the kitchen/stay home/take care of the children’. There are a lot of women who prefer to get jobs, help support their family, and contribute to society by getting jobs. It should not be the man’s job to bring home the pay check. With the wife bringing one home too, hey more money! Also, both: The opposite sex is not a sex object. No gender is a sex object. The human body is not a sex object. Stop treating it as such.

Tumblr/tumblr gay shippers

For fuck’s sake, do you listen to yourselves when you say ‘make heterosexuality illegal’

…Just think over that.

This one last topic:

Anyone can rape. Anyone. And it’s still fucking serious.

Men can rape women.
Women can rape men.
Women can rape women.
Men can rape men.

Not saying that they should, but It’s just as important/serious. I’ve seen arguments saying it’s not as mentally/physically damaging if a man is raped, or he’s ‘gay’ because he didn’t enjoy it, or that he’s ‘weak’ because a woman ‘overpowered’ him.

Just stop.

Rape is serious. Okay? Okay.

But please, can we all just practice some empathy before we start arguments/bashing? We all have different opinions. Just ‘take a step in the other person’s shoes’. 

We shouldn’t act like a bag of dicks. Seriously.

(Also, I would like to point out that I’m not straight and support gay marriage, but hetero people exist and is the ‘norm’, as they say, and I’m alright with that. Anyone hating on anybody won’t make them any better)

I like how this is one of the ONLY things I have seen on Tumblr today that makes sense and isn’t just “Hurrr, straight white male privilege,” yet it doesn’t even get a quarter of reposts or likes than any of that dribble. Everyone just needs to shut the fuck up, grow up, and get along.

(via yipsinternally)

Reblogged from ding-dong-bryan-wong

fuckyeahsexyatheists:

On this day when every public school in the US has the day off but I have to go to class, have some Bruce Willis dying Easter eggs.

(Source: ding-dong-bryan-wong, via jumpingjacktrash)